Keelson & Scuppers

  

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The keelson is installed in slots cut into the horizontal ribs and ties into the transom and stem.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The slots to accept the keelson will be cut using a jig I made and a router. The finished slots will be exactly 4" wide.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The router sits on top of the jig and the guide bushing will run around the inside edges of the jig to ensure the right size cutout.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

View of 4" cutout slots from the bow. One of the few pictures taken by someone else, btw that's me (JK)!

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The keelson is a ¾" x 4" x 18’ length of spanish cedar that will be glued and nailed into the slots with 2 ½" annular nails.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The bow stem is cut ¾" deep to accept the keelson.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

A template/jig is created by making repeated compound angle cuts and fitting to bow stem.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The template (right) is used as a jig for cutting the keelson’s (left) angles and lines.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

Epoxy is then poured into the bow stem and the keelson is inserted and nailed in place.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The keelson is glued and nailed with 3 - 2" annular nails at each slot in the horizontal ribs.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The end of the keelson is cut at an angle to match the transom, it is then glued and nailed through the transom.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

View of completed keelson.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

A scupper cutting jig I made.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

The same method of cutting with a router that was used for the keelson will be used to cut the scuppers.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

Starboard side scuppers.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

Port side scuppers.

Click/tap to Enlarge Image

Completed scuppers.