Hull Bottom

  

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The surfaces that the bottom is applied to must first be flat and smooth. The picture shows the chine before being prepared.

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The majority of preparation is done to the chine using a jig attached to the planer to ensure the cuts are level and straight.

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The right tip of the jig is kept on a length of wood that is the same height as the jig, this keeps the planer level. Multiple incremental cuts will be made until the bottom surfaces of the ribs, chine, transom and keelson are smooth and level.

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View of the starboard side from the transom after multiple passes with the planer/jig.

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The curve of the bow is the most critical and difficult area to complete. View of the bow after multiple passes with the planer/jig.

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View of the port side after multiple passes with the planer/jig.

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The ribs and chine are leveled side to side and front to back. The surfaces are checked after each pass with a straight edge.

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The scuppers are treated with epoxy to ensure waterproofing, it is much easier to apply epoxy to the scuppers before installing the bottom.

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The same type of ply's that were used in preparing the hull sides are used for the bottom. 2 - 4’ x 18’ x ⅜" ply's are used. Each ply is laid on the bottom and marked for approximate shape then transferred to saw horses and cut to shape with a circular saw.

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After cutting to shape the ply is moved back onto the bottom and layout marks are made. The plys will overhang the transom and be trimmed to a 3" overhang when installing the keel.

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The layout marks indicate where nails should be driven. The X’s are where the scuppers are and no nails are driven there.

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Resin glue is applied to all the surfaces that were previously leveled and smoothed. Annular nails are then driven into the layout lines. 1½" annular nails spaced 1½" apart are use along the chine. 2" annular nails spaced 2" apart are used in the ribs and transom. 1" annular nails spaced 1½" apart are used in the keelson.

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View from the bow of the starboard side bottom.

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The same procedure is used to attach the port side bottom.

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To complete the bottom, the edges must be planed flush with the chine. This will be accomplished by using a combination of a router, a planer and a belt sander.

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The port edge after trimming with a flush trim bit on a router.

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The same edge after planning smooth.

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Same edge again after sanding.

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The completed bottom is now ready for the keel, forefoot and strakes.